How To Make A Pinkeep

Ornament

Once you have decided on the circle size to suit finished stitching: Cut one circle from 1mm thick white cardboard Cut one circle from 300gsm white card You will also need the following supplies: White PVA craft glue which dries clear 14 white pearl headed pins 55cm length of 9mm satin ribbon in a complementary colour Complementary lightweight cotton fabric for ornament backing Cream coloured sewing thread, Sharp needle, sewing pins, fabric scissors, tape measure or ruler indicating centimetres METHOD 1. Press stitched linen face down on a flat, clean surface with a steam iron. Centre one of the circles on the back of the stitched piece and measure and mark a 2cm seam allowance from the edge of the cardboard circle onto the linen. Cut out linen on these marks. 2. Using the circle of linen as a template, cut out a piece of lightweight cotton fabric to the same size. 3. Measure in 1cm from the raw edge of the linen circle and sew a line of gathering stitches with a sharp needle and a doubled-over length of sewing thread around the circle. Centre the thick cardboard circle on the wrong side of the linen and draw up the gathering thread tightly to encase the cardboard circle. Once you are happy with the placement of the cardboard circle, finish off your sewing thread tightly. 4. Repeat with the lining fabric and the 300gsm white card. 5. With wrong sides together, glue the lining to the stitched linen and place under a couple of heavy books until the glue is dry. 6. To make the ribbon hanger: start from one end of the ribbon, make a loop about 8cm in diameter, and hold it in the middle whilst you make the next loop about 6cm in diameter, then fold the remaining ribbon into a hanging loop. Pin altogether with a pearl headed pin. 7. Slide the pin into the top of the ornament between the back and front of the ornament. Then, in the same way, slide pearl headed pins around the edge of the ornament at regular intervals. Once you are happy with the placement of the pins, carefully remove the ribbon and pin from the top of the ornament and add a little glue to the pin, then gently replace back into the ornament. This will help to ensure that the hanger does not pull out of the ornament when you hang it on your tree.

How To Make A Humbug Fob/Ornament

Humbugs get their name because they resemble the shape of the old- fashioned English sweet. They are fun and quick to make up as scissor fobs or hanging ornaments. There is really only one rule of thumb for these little fellows. The finished stitched piece needs to be twice as long as it is high for this kind of finish to be successful. In other words, if the design is 42 stitches long, then it needs to be 21 stitches high. METHOD If you would like to finish your humbug like the one in the picture, make a twisted cord with a finished length of 25cm (10″), fold in half and tie raw ends off in a knot. Make a tassel with a finished length proportional to the size of your humbug. 1. If you have not already done so, create a backstitch rectangle around your stitched piece, remembering the rule that long edges of the rectangle need to be twice as long as the short edges. Use one strand of thread to complete the backstitching. 2. Cut 1cm (3/8″) seam allowances around each of the four backstitch edges, and finger fold to the wrong side of the stitched piece. 3. Fold the piece in half, wrong sides together, matching the two short edges. 4. Starting from the bottom corner, work up the short edge, using one strand of thread and a sharp needle to whipstitch the sides together to create a cylinder. 5. Continue around the corner and to almost halfway along the top edge. Tuck in the knotted end of the twisted cord hanger, secure with a couple of locking stitches, and continue whipstitching to the end of the edge. Finish off the thread. 6. Push the side seam to the middle of the open bottom edge to create a closure which is 90 degrees to the top closed edge, matching the backstitches. This creates the ‘humbug’ shape. Whipstitch the bottom edge closed to just about half way and park your needle. 7. Fill the humbug with stuffing to a firm fill, tuck in the tassel top, secure with a couple of locking stitches, and continue whipstitching to the end of the edge. Finish off the thread. Humbug all finished!

How To Make Bookcloth

YOU WILL NEED100% cotton quilters fabric (this works best) to size required, ironed flat Heat ‘n’ Bond® Lite iron on adhesive (or similar) to size required Piece of white acid free tissue paper, ironed flat to remove fold marks if necessary Iron and ironing board METHOD 1. Apply the adhesive to the wrong side of the fabric, as per the manufacturers instructions. 2. Allow to cool and peel off the paper liner from the adhesive. 3. Place the piece of acid free tissue paper (shiny side up) on top of the adhesive, ensuring that it covers all of the adhesive. If it doesn’t the adhesive will melt onto your iron – yukko! 4. Iron over the tissue paper as you did when applying the adhesive. 5. Once done, flip over the fabric and iron again. 6. Once cool, trim any tissue paper that is hanging over the edge of the fabric. 7. Et voilà! Bookcloth good to go!

How To Make An Airline-Proof Travel Kit

If I’m travelling by car, it means I can take as many accessories, lights, magnifying glasses and several projects to choose from as there is always room for ‘just one more thing’ in the back of the car. However, most of my travelling these days requires me to get onto a ‘plane. And that means I have to be judicious about the number of projects, accessories and stitching aids I can realistically fit into my suitcase. It also means that if I want to stitch on the ‘plane I have to be able to get through the airport security screening without having to hand over various items deemed ‘hazardous’ by the security personnel, and have a small, but successful stitching ‘kit’ which works in the confined space of the ‘plane seat. So I have devised a very simple, but successful stitching kit which I take with me on my travels. It works very well on a ‘plane flight. It also works very well in a classroom situation where you are restricted for space. It also means that you don’t have to lug heavy lights around with you in your suitcase, and worry about transformers etc when travelling to a stitching class in a foreign country. I had some specific requirements when I built my kit. It had to be able to be tucked into my carry-on luggage (which is a laptop computer bag – so quite restrictive). It had to be light (obviously), reasonably quick and easy to assemble once on the ‘plane, and able to be collapsed flat and stored on my lap under my tray table, when breakfast/lunch/dinner was served. Here is my tried and tested kit – a jumping off point for a kit of your own which you can personalise to make it work for you and your travel requirements. 1. Container The container needs to be made of rigid plastic to support the magnifying light and deep enough to cope with the jaws of the magnifying light clamp. The one I use holds an A4 size chart and is about 2.5cm or 1″ deep. I found these boxes in Officeworks in the document storage and presentation aisle.  I use these boxes all time to keep my various stitching projects safe as they stack on shelves easily and I can see what’s in them at a glance. 2. Thread Storage Pocket Now, we all have our favourite ways of thread storage. But this is something else! It is an Edmar Thread Organiser. You cut your threads into approximately 60cm lengths and pull them through the little pocket ridges. The threads are kept clean, straight and all together and there’s room to put the thread number tags for identification, all very useful considerations when your space is restricted. This particular storage system allows you to pull through only as many ply of a particular colour thread you need at any one time. There is room for 16 different threads in one sleeve. 3. Nail Clippers The Australian airport security checkers are still very strict about scissors, even embroidery scissors. I have given up arguing with them about points on scissors and have decided that a nice new pair of nail clippers is the way to go. They are sharp, and enable you to cut the threads close to the fabric, which means no messy dangly ends to catch into your work by mistake. They also breeze through the security checks without any hassle at all! I thread my clippers onto a length of ribbon, which when tied into a loop allows me to wear them around my neck. This stops them from falling down onto the floor of the ‘plane. 4. Thimble & Hoop I can’t stitch without a thimble. It’s a bit like I can’t think without my glasses on … but that’s just a personal quirk and you don’t have to have a thimble unless like me, it’s a given that you wear one when you stitch. I need a hoop for speciality stitches, but don’t take one if I am just doing cross stitch. Again, a personal preference thing. 5. Magnifying Light with Flexible Neck Some of you with younger and stronger eyes than mine might just need a clip-on light, but I need a magnifying light. This one runs on 3 AAA batteries and lasts forever. And just in case forever is up and your batteries run out – this type of battery can be bought all around the world, and is a type that most airport newsagencies carry. The gooseneck allows you to position the rimless magnifying glass in just the right position, and the LED light is cool, and perfect for stitching in a dimly lit plane.  In Australia you can buy these here. There are other sorts of flexible necked magnifying glasses and lights – your local needlework shop will probably have some to choose from. Just make sure that you choose on of the clamp variety, and that it will clamp onto your container. OK – so how does this all work for me? Packing I prepare my fabric, and ensure that I have at least four embroidery needles of the correct size tucked into a corner of the fabric if I don’t have room in my container for a  needlebook. I thread my plastic sleeve with the project threads. Then I pack the project chart, fabric, thread pocket, nail clippers, thimble and hoop into the project container. I pop it and my magnifying lamp into one side of my laptop bag and I’m good to go. On The ‘Plane I get my magnifying light and container out of my laptop bag. I unpack the container and close it. I use the clip that keeps my tray table secure against the back of the chair in front of me to hold my chart up.  I put my nail clipper ribbon around my neck and put on my thimble. I select my first threads, and then fold the thread pocket in half and place under the container which is on my lap. The container then becomes a mini lap table. I clamp my magnifying lamp onto one side of the container, turn on the light, thread my needle and I’m ready for several hours of stitching. When a meal arrives, I quickly fold everything up, pop the fabric into the container for safekeeping, lay the magnifying glass and chart down on my lap over the container, undo the tray table and eat my meal. When it’s time to land, I just pack everything back into the container and slide it and my lamp into my laptop bag. I hope this has helped you think about how to set up your own travel kit.

How To Make A Simple Drawstring Bag With A

Stitched Front Panel

YOU WILL NEED 2  x rectangles of patchwork weight cotton fabric (bag fabric) 13cm wide x 20 cm deep 2 x 40cm lengths of 1cm wide ribbon Machine sewing cotton to match fabric Piece of lightweight fusible interfacing 13cm wide x 9.5cm deep Cut stitched fabric so that the motif is centred in a 13xm wide x 9.5cm deep rectangle METHOD 1. Fuse interfacing to the wrong side of stitched rectangle. 2. With right sides facing, place the stitched fabric rectangle onto one bag fabric rectangle, aligning the top long edge of the stitched fabric rectangle with the bottom long edge of the bag fabric rectangle. 3. Pin in place and then machine sew together with a 1cm seam allowance. 4. Press seam open with an iron. 5. Measuring from the base of the stitched panel, measure up 20cm and trim the bag fabric, so that both sides of the bag are now 20cm deep. 6. Place both bag pieces right sides together, matching top and sides. Pin in place and then machine sew a 1cm seam allowance around both sides and the bottom of the bag. 7. Trim seam allowances back to 0.5cm and clip corners to take out the bulk of the seam allowance (being careful not to cut into the machine sewing line).  Turn your bag to the right side and press with an iron. 8. Create the top hem by folding down the top raw edge to the inside of the bag to make a 1cm hem and iron into place. Then fold down a further 3cm and iron and pin into place. Machine stitch close to the edge. 9. Create the drawstring casing by machine sewing a line of stitching 1.5cm from the top edge of the bag. 10. Trim seam allowances back to 0.5cm and clip corners to take out the bulk of the seam allowance (being careful not to cut into the machine sewing line).  Turn your bag to the right side and press with an iron. 11. With a seam unpicker carefully unpick the stitches in each side seam between the two lines of stitching which make the drawstring casing. 12. Thread one length of ribbon through the casing from the left hand side seam opening, and bring out through the same opening. Tie off ribbon ends in a knot. Thread the other length of ribbon through the casing from the right hand side seam opening, and bring out through the same opening. Tie off ends in a knot. 13. Fill your little bag with goodies and pull the drawstrings to close the bag.

How To Make A Tea Cup Pin Cushion

These are delightful little gifts and needn’t be expensive to make. I discover pretty little cup and saucer sets at local thrift shops for very little money. I then stash-dive for thread and linen to match. Once you have found your tea cup, and chosen a design and thread colours, you will need to decide what count linen you require to work your project on. I work on the basis of leaving a centimetre of blank linen visible around the edges of my pin cushion. I measure the diameter of the tea cup, deduct 2 centimetres from that measurement and that’s the space I have to fit my stitching into. I work out how many stitches my design takes, then calculate what ‘count’ of  linen I need to make the design fit into the desired space. You will also need to work out how much linen you require to work your project on. My rule of thumb is this. Cut a square of linen double the size of the diameter of the tea cup rim, plus 5cm. This will then give you ample room to cut out the pin cushion circle once you are ready to make it. METHOD Complete the stitched design and press with warm iron to remove any wrinkles in the linen. Fuse a piece of lightweight interfacing (I use Vilene H1180) to the wrong side of the stitched piece. Take a compass and spread it out to the same size as the diameter of your tea cup. With the right side of your stitching facing you, locate the centre of your stitching and carefully put the point of the compass on the centre point of the design. Carefully draw a circle onto the linen. This will create a circle with a diameter of twice the diameter of the tea cup. Cut out the linen on the drawn line. With a sharp needle and a double sewing thread, complete a line of gathering stitches 1.5cm from the raw edge around the circle of linen. Pull up the thread to create a pouch, leaving a small hole through which to poke the stuffing. Finish off the sewing thread. Stuff the pin cushion with polyester toyfill to a very firm consistency. This will ensure that the cushion has a lovely plump look. Smoosh (a very technical term) around the pin cushion to ensure that it looks evenly stuffed. At this stage test it for size in the teacup. As this isn’t an exact science, you may need to take a little stuffing out, or add a bit more to get it to sit comfortably in the teacup. Once you are happy with the position of the pin cushion in the cup, apply craft glue to the underside of the pin cushion and hold it in the cup until it is dry. If you so desire, you can then glue the tea cup to it’s saucer. How To Make A Pin Cushion Scissor Pocket Download Free Pin Cushion Scissor Pocket Chart and Instructions These are quick and enjoyable to make. You probably have little squares of linen and pretty fabrics in your stash which you could match with threads in your collection to make several of these for stitching friends. Included in the download is a more generalised version of the chart which says PINS rather than LOVE. How To Make A Strawberry Emery Download Free Strawberry Emery Pincushion Chart and Instructions Strawberry emeries have been around for centuries and were originally designed to keep pins and needles sharp and rust free. They were made from pretty scraps of fabric (often velvet) and filled with emery powder. Here is my cross-stitch version for your enjoyment.

How To …

© Janie Hubble Designs | 35 Bailey Road, Lesmurdie Western Australia 6076
top

How To Make A Pinkeep

Ornament

Once you have decided on the circle size to suit finished stitching: Cut one circle from 1mm thick white cardboard Cut one circle from 300gsm white card You will also need the following supplies: White PVA craft glue which dries clear 14 white pearl headed pins 55cm length of 9mm satin ribbon in a complementary colour Complementary lightweight cotton fabric for ornament backing Cream coloured sewing thread, Sharp needle, sewing pins, fabric scissors, tape measure or ruler indicating centimetres METHOD 1. Press stitched linen face down on a flat, clean surface with a steam iron. Centre one of the circles on the back of the stitched piece and measure and mark a 2cm seam allowance from the edge of the cardboard circle onto the linen. Cut out linen on these marks. 2. Using the circle of linen as a template, cut out a piece of lightweight cotton fabric to the same size. 3. Measure in 1cm from the raw edge of the linen circle and sew a line of gathering stitches with a sharp needle and a doubled-over length of sewing thread around the circle. Centre the thick cardboard circle on the wrong side of the linen and draw up the gathering thread tightly to encase the cardboard circle. Once you are happy with the placement of the cardboard circle, finish off your sewing thread tightly. 4. Repeat with the lining fabric and the 300gsm white card. 5. With wrong sides together, glue the lining to the stitched linen and place under a couple of heavy books until the glue is dry. 6. To make the ribbon hanger: start from one end of the ribbon, make a loop about 8cm in diameter, and hold it in the middle whilst you make the next loop about 6cm in diameter, then fold the remaining ribbon into a hanging loop. Pin altogether with a pearl headed pin. 7. Slide the pin into the top of the ornament between the back and front of the ornament. Then, in the same way, slide pearl headed pins around the edge of the ornament at regular intervals. Once you are happy with the placement of the pins, carefully remove the ribbon and pin from the top of the ornament and add a little glue to the pin, then gently replace back into the ornament. This will help to ensure that the hanger does not pull out of the ornament when you hang it on your tree.

How To Make A Humbug

Fob/Ornament

Humbugs get their name because they resemble the shape of the old-fashioned English sweet. They are fun and quick to make up as scissor fobs or hanging ornaments. There is really only one rule of thumb for these little fellows. The finished stitched piece needs to be twice as long as it is high for this kind of finish to be successful. In other words, if the design is 42 stitches long, then it needs to be 21 stitches high. METHOD If you would like to finish your humbug like the one in the picture, make a twisted cord with a finished length of 25cm (10″), fold in half and tie raw ends off in a knot. Make a tassel with a finished length proportional to the size of your humbug. 1. If you have not already done so, create a backstitch rectangle around your stitched piece, remembering the rule that long edges of the rectangle need to be twice as long as the short edges. Use one strand of thread to complete the backstitching. 2. Cut 1cm (3/8″) seam allowances around each of the four backstitch edges, and finger fold to the wrong side of the stitched piece. 3. Fold the piece in half, wrong sides together, matching the two short edges. 4. Starting from the bottom corner, work up the short edge, using one strand of thread and a sharp needle to whipstitch the sides together to create a cylinder. 5. Continue around the corner and to almost halfway along the top edge. Tuck in the knotted end of the twisted cord hanger, secure with a couple of locking stitches, and continue whipstitching to the end of the edge. Finish off the thread. 6. Push the side seam to the middle of the open bottom edge to create a closure which is 90 degrees to the top closed edge, matching the backstitches. This creates the ‘humbug’ shape. Whipstitch the bottom edge closed to just about half way and park your needle. 7. Fill the humbug with stuffing to a firm fill, tuck in the tassel top, secure with a couple of locking stitches, and continue whipstitching to the end of the edge. Finish off the thread. Humbug all finished!

How To Make Bookcloth 

YOU WILL NEED100% cotton quilters fabric (this works best) to size required, ironed flat Heat ‘n’ Bond® Lite iron on adhesive (or similar) to size required Piece of white acid free tissue paper, ironed flat to remove fold marks if necessary Iron and ironing board METHOD 1. Apply the adhesive to the wrong side of the fabric, as per the manufacturers instructions. 2. Allow to cool and peel off the paper liner from the adhesive. 3. Place the piece of acid free tissue paper (shiny side up) on top of the adhesive, ensuring that it covers all of the adhesive. If it doesn’t the adhesive will melt onto your iron – yukko! 4. Iron over the tissue paper as you did when applying the adhesive. 5. Once done, flip over the fabric and iron again. 6. Once cool, trim any tissue paper that is hanging over the edge of the fabric. 7. Et voilà! Bookcloth good to go!

How To Make An Airline-Proof

Travel Kit

If I’m travelling by car, it means I can take as many accessories, lights, magnifying glasses and several projects to choose from as there is always room for ‘just one more thing’ in the back of the car. However, most of my travelling these days requires me to get onto a ‘plane. And that means I have to be judicious about the number of projects, accessories and stitching aids I can realistically fit into my suitcase. It also means that if I want to stitch on the ‘plane I have to be able to get through the airport security screening without having to hand over various items deemed ‘hazardous’ by the security personnel, and have a small, but successful stitching ‘kit’ which works in the confined space of the ‘plane seat. So I have devised a very simple, but successful stitching kit which I take with me on my travels. It works very well on a ‘plane flight. It also works very well in a classroom situation where you are restricted for space. It also means that you don’t have to lug heavy lights around with you in your suitcase, and worry about transformers etc when travelling to a stitching class in a foreign country. I had some specific requirements when I built my kit. It had to be able to be tucked into my carry-on luggage (which is a laptop computer bag – so quite restrictive). It had to be light (obviously), reasonably quick and easy to assemble once on the ‘plane, and able to be collapsed flat and stored on my lap under my tray table, when breakfast/lunch/dinner was served. Here is my tried and tested kit – a jumping off point for a kit of your own which you can personalise to make it work for you and your travel requirements. 1. Container The container needs to be made of rigid plastic to support the magnifying light and deep enough to cope with the jaws of the magnifying light clamp. The one I use holds an A4 size chart and is about 2.5cm or 1″ deep. I found these boxes in Officeworks in the document storage and presentation aisle.  I use these boxes all time to keep my various stitching projects safe as they stack on shelves easily and I can see what’s in them at a glance. 2. Thread Storage Pocket Now, we all have our favourite ways of thread storage. But this is something else! It is an Edmar Thread Organiser. You cut your threads into approximately 60cm lengths and pull them through the little pocket ridges. The threads are kept clean, straight and all together and there’s room to put the thread number tags for identification, all very useful considerations when your space is restricted. This particular storage system allows you to pull through only as many ply of a particular colour thread you need at any one time. There is room for 16 different threads in one sleeve. 3. Nail Clippers The Australian airport security checkers are still very strict about scissors, even embroidery scissors. I have given up arguing with them about points on scissors and have decided that a nice new pair of nail clippers is the way to go. They are sharp, and enable you to cut the threads close to the fabric, which means no messy dangly ends to catch into your work by mistake. They also breeze through the security checks without any hassle at all! I thread my clippers onto a length of ribbon, which when tied into a loop allows me to wear them around my neck. This stops them from falling down onto the floor of the ‘plane. 4. Thimble & Hoop I can’t stitch without a thimble. It’s a bit like I can’t think without my glasses on … but that’s just a personal quirk and you don’t have to have a thimble unless like me, it’s a given that you wear one when you stitch. I need a hoop for speciality stitches, but don’t take one if I am just doing cross stitch. Again, a personal preference thing. 5. Magnifying Light with Flexible Neck Some of you with younger and stronger eyes than mine might just need a clip-on light, but I need a magnifying light. This one runs on 3 AAA batteries and lasts forever. And just in case forever is up and your batteries run out – this type of battery can be bought all around the world, and is a type that most airport newsagencies carry. The gooseneck allows you to position the rimless magnifying glass in just the right position, and the LED light is cool, and perfect for stitching in a dimly lit plane.  In Australia you can buy these here. There are other sorts of flexible necked magnifying glasses and lights – your local needlework shop will probably have some to choose from. Just make sure that you choose on of the clamp variety, and that it will clamp onto your container. OK – so how does this all work for me? Packing I prepare my fabric, and ensure that I have at least four embroidery needles of the correct size tucked into a corner of the fabric if I don’t have room in my container for a  needlebook. I thread my plastic sleeve with the project threads. Then I pack the project chart, fabric, thread pocket, nail clippers, thimble and hoop into the project container. I pop it and my magnifying lamp into one side of my laptop bag and I’m good to go. On The ‘Plane I get my magnifying light and container out of my laptop bag. I unpack the container and close it. I use the clip that keeps my tray table secure against the back of the chair in front of me to hold my chart up.  I put my nail clipper ribbon around my neck and put on my thimble. I select my first threads, and then fold the thread pocket in half and place under the container which is on my lap. The container then becomes a mini lap table. I clamp my magnifying lamp onto one side of the container, turn on the light, thread my needle and I’m ready for several hours of stitching. When a meal arrives, I quickly fold everything up, pop the fabric into the container for safekeeping, lay the magnifying glass and chart down on my lap over the container, undo the tray table and eat my meal. When it’s time to land, I just pack everything back into the container and slide it and my lamp into my laptop bag. I hope this has helped you think about how to set up your own travel kit.

How To Make A Simple

Drawstring Bag With A Stitched

Front Panel

YOU WILL NEED 2  x rectangles of patchwork weight cotton fabric (bag fabric) 13cm wide x 20 cm deep 2 x 40cm lengths of 1cm wide ribbon Machine sewing cotton to match fabric Piece of lightweight fusible interfacing 13cm wide x 9.5cm deep Cut stitched fabric so that the motif is centred in a 13xm wide x 9.5cm deep rectangle METHOD 1. Fuse interfacing to the wrong side of stitched rectangle. 2. With right sides facing, place the stitched fabric rectangle onto one bag fabric rectangle, aligning the top long edge of the stitched fabric rectangle with the bottom long edge of the bag fabric rectangle. 3. Pin in place and then machine sew together with a 1cm seam allowance. 4. Press seam open with an iron. 5. Measuring from the base of the stitched panel, measure up 20cm and trim the bag fabric, so that both sides of the bag are now 20cm deep. 6. Place both bag pieces right sides together, matching top and sides. Pin in place and then machine sew a 1cm seam allowance around both sides and the bottom of the bag. 7. Trim seam allowances back to 0.5cm and clip corners to take out the bulk of the seam allowance (being careful not to cut into the machine sewing line).  Turn your bag to the right side and press with an iron. 8. Create the top hem by folding down the top raw edge to the inside of the bag to make a 1cm hem and iron into place. Then fold down a further 3cm and iron and pin into place. Machine stitch close to the edge. 9. Create the drawstring casing by machine sewing a line of stitching 1.5cm from the top edge of the bag. 10. Trim seam allowances back to 0.5cm and clip corners to take out the bulk of the seam allowance (being careful not to cut into the machine sewing line).  Turn your bag to the right side and press with an iron. 11. With a seam unpicker carefully unpick the stitches in each side seam between the two lines of stitching which make the drawstring casing. 12. Thread one length of ribbon through the casing from the left hand side seam opening, and bring out through the same opening. Tie off ribbon ends in a knot. Thread the other length of ribbon through the casing from the right hand side seam opening, and bring out through the same opening. Tie off ends in a knot. 13. Fill your little bag with goodies and pull the drawstrings to close the bag.

How To Make A Tea Cup Pin

Cushion

These are delightful little gifts and needn’t be expensive to make. I discover pretty little cup and saucer sets at local thrift shops for very little money. I then stash-dive for thread and linen to match. Once you have found your tea cup, and chosen a design and thread colours, you will need to decide what count linen you require to work your project on. I work on the basis of leaving a centimetre of blank linen visible around the edges of my pin cushion. I measure the diameter of the tea cup, deduct 2 centimetres from that measurement and that’s the space I have to fit my stitching into. I work out how many stitches my design takes, then calculate what ‘count’ of  linen I need to make the design fit into the desired space. You will also need to work out how much linen you require to work your project on. My rule of thumb is this. Cut a square of linen double the size of the diameter of the tea cup rim, plus 5cm. This will then give you ample room to cut out the pin cushion circle once you are ready to make it. METHOD Complete the stitched design and press with warm iron to remove any wrinkles in the linen. Fuse a piece of lightweight interfacing (I use Vilene H1180) to the wrong side of the stitched piece. Take a compass and spread it out to the same size as the diameter of your tea cup. With the right side of your stitching facing you, locate the centre of your stitching and carefully put the point of the compass on the centre point of the design. Carefully draw a circle onto the linen. This will create a circle with a diameter of twice the diameter of the tea cup. Cut out the linen on the drawn line. With a sharp needle and a double sewing thread, complete a line of gathering stitches 1.5cm from the raw edge around the circle of linen. Pull up the thread to create a pouch, leaving a small hole through which to poke the stuffing. Finish off the sewing thread. Stuff the pin cushion with polyester toyfill to a very firm consistency. This will ensure that the cushion has a lovely plump look. Smoosh (a very technical term) around the pin cushion to ensure that it looks evenly stuffed. At this stage test it for size in the teacup. As this isn’t an exact science, you may need to take a little stuffing out, or add a bit more to get it to sit comfortably in the teacup. Once you are happy with the position of the pin cushion in the cup, apply craft glue to the underside of the pin cushion and hold it in the cup until it is dry. If you so desire, you can then glue the tea cup to it’s saucer. finish How To Make A Pin Cushion Scissor Pocket Download Free Pin Cushion Scissor Pocket Chart and Instructions These are quick and enjoyable to make. You probably have little squares of linen and pretty fabrics in your stash which you could match with threads in your collection to make several of these for stitching friends. Included in the download is a more generalised version of the chart which says PINS rather than LOVE. How To Make A Strawberry Emery Strawberry emeries have been around for centuries and were originally designed to keep pins and needles sharp and rust free. They were made from pretty scraps of fabric (often velvet) and filled with emery powder. Here is my cross-stitch version for your enjoyment.             

How To …

© Janie Hubble Designs     Lesmurdie Western Australia 6076
top